Eid around the world

Last week, Muslims around the world celebrated Eid. The most anticipated event of the year.  I recently posted a video on how I celebrate Eid and what it’s about. This time I collaborated with some amazing travelers to show you their Eid. This is Eid around the world.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

Eid Around The World- Atikah

Atikah

Passionate about giving voice and agency to women in Singapore, and about living a mindful and purposeful life, Atikah seeks to inspire others to live a life focusing on purpose, authenticity, and giving back to society. Through her blog and Instagram account, she is on a journey to write the story of the human spirit, particularly from her lens as a  Malay/Muslim woman. She consistently finds ways to give back to the world while providing opportunities for others to do so as well, whether through her writing, developing life skills or volunteering with various organizations. She founded Rainbows for Batam and the Rainbow Bake Sale,  a social volunteer project for young adults that include charity bake sales and trips to orphanages in Indonesia. Recently, she led a team of volunteers for the NONE exhibition, in collaboration with Advocates for Refugees (Singapore), where the story of Rohingya refugees was told.  She is also actively encouraging young women to pursue a career in technology, serving as the Vice-President of The Codette Project. In addition to that, she is an English and Literature teacher at a local secondary school, where she seeks to inspire her kids to be better humans.

You can follow Atikah’s journey on her Blog and Instagram feed

What country do you currently live in?

Singapore!

On a scale of 1 – 10 how excited are you for EID this year?

10! It’s sad to see Ramadhan leave but Eid is always a good time for celebration.

How do you celebrate EID?

We start the day with going for Eid prayers and then coming home to be with the family. Our Eid game is strong here in Singapore. We have a special feast for Eid, with traditional food such as ketupat, lodeh, rendang and sambal goreng! We also take out our traditional clothes full force for this, so it’s a really colorful spectacle! In the Malay culture too, Eid is the opportune time to start on a clean slate; the one time you can randomly ask EVERYONE you know for forgiveness. Our greeting is “Selamat Hari Raya, maaf zahir batin” which is essentially translated to “Happy Eid, please forgive me for the seen and unseen mistakes I’ve done to you.” We celebrate Eid for a month, so through Shawwal (Islamic month after fasting), we will find time to visit relatives and friends to reconnect, rejuvenate and to strengthen our relationships.

Do you get days off from work/school for EID?

Yes! This year, Eid fell on a Sunday, so we had Monday off as well.

What makes EID special to you?

It’s a special time to reconnect with relatives and friends, as well as to seek and grant forgiveness. It also is a time to reflect on those who have already left and to appreciate those who are still around.

In your own opinion where’s the best place to celebrate EID?

In Singapore/Malaysia, we celebrate Eid for a month so… definitely here.

What would you like Non- Muslims around the world to know about EID?

It’s a great time for celebration, family, strengthening relationships and good food, so if you can, join in the festivities! ❤

 
EID 2017: Bilquis
 

Bilqis

 

 Bilqis is a 20 something-year-old media professional and beauty consultant with a passion for content creation. She is the co-founder of Official Hijabi TV, A Muslimah lifestyle media platform for Muslim women. Find out more about Official Hijabi here.  Also, follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram
 What country do you currently live in?

USA.

On a scale of 1 – 10 how excited are you for EID this year?

10! I am extremely excited for Eid. I didn’t get to celebrate it last year, and I’m so blessed to be involved this year. Alhamdulillah.

How do you celebrate EID?

I celebrate Eid with my family and close friends. I go to the praying ground with my family, and then afterwards, we all meet up with other family members and basically have a great time cooking, catching up, and all that other good stuff that comes with holidays.

Do you get days off from work/school for EID?

I’m an entrepreneur, so even if I don’t, I definitely will give myself a day off!

What makes EID special to you?

Eid is a very special day for me. Ever since I was a kid, I’ve always looked forward to Eid. I have a lot of sisters and brothers and we get to travel to go spend time with all our extended family we don’t see throughout the year. My Mum always makes matching outfits. Even as a grown up now and married, Eid is still so dear to my heart and I get to spend it with even more family members. It’s a time to come together as a unit and create traditions and memories that will be passed down for generations.

EID 2017: Celebrating with the family

In your own opinion where’s the best place to celebrate EID?

HOME. It doesn’t matter in what city, country, or continent. As long as its home, its where the heart is. 

What would you like Non- Muslims around the world to know about EID?

Eid is all about LOVE and SHARING. Islam is a religion of peace and it has bestowed upon us so many blessings and Eid is one of them. Everyone regardless of your religion is welcome to celebrate Eid with us. 

EID 2017: Bilquis

 

 

Eid Around The World-Kareemah

Kareema

Kareema works in an investment bank and posts pictures of her travels whenever she can.

Connect with Kareema on her Instagram

What country do you currently live in?

I live In Paris.

On a scale of 1 – 10 how excited are you for EID this year?

8.

How do you celebrate EID?

I don’ work. I spend the day at home with my parents and sisters. As our family is in Morocco, we call to wish them a Happy Eid.

Do you get days off from work/school for EID?

Yes.

What makes EID special to you?

This is the best time to gather the family and spend memorable and enjoyable moments.

In your own opinion where’s the best place to celebrate EID?

Close to your family in a Muslim country.

What would you like Non- Muslims around the world to know about EID?

I wish you could know how meaningful this is. This is all about great food, good energies, prayers for yourself, humanity, laughter, and hugs. It is a positive day.
 
 
 
 Eid around the world- Rashid
 

 Rashid

 Rashid is a filmmaker. He is currently involved in the production of a film documenting the rugby scene in Libya during the civil war.

Check out Rashid’s work and follow him on Instagram

What country do you currently live in?

I live in Indianapolis, USA.

On a scale of 1 – 10 how excited are you for EID this year?

As for Eid, I would say that it’d be hard to put a number on how excited I am – my schedule is fluid and constantly changing, to where I’m sort of objective to the days and weeks. That being said, a 5 is my level of excitement for this year’s Eid, simply because I will be working away from family during it and afterwards.

How do you celebrate EID?

Normally, we take it easy on Eid day. The night before we tend to stay up late, and we go to Eid prayer with bags under our eyes, wearing traditional North African thobes. Even though we’re sleepy, we find the time to give our salam to everyone at the prayer. After we’ve had enough donuts and coffee, we nap once we reach home, and almost always go out as a family to have lunch. However: this year I will be alone, for the most part, during Eid, working.

Eid around the world

Eid celebration in Libya

Do you get days off from work/school for EID?

Work will always come second to Eid as a celebration; however, depending on the project and the time of the year, my work might put me in another part of the country/world. My schedule will make room for it, but, unfortunately, at times I find myself miles and miles away from family (but I still enjoy what I do!)

What makes EID special to you?

Spending time with family is the best part of Eid! It’s a day where you all feel Ramadan pass together, and even though sometimes you wish Ramadan would stay all year round, it can feel amazing to have it end on a day during which you hang out with your friends and spend quality time with family.

In your own opinion, where’s the best place to celebrate EID?

Well, in suburbia things are quiet. You don’t have much extended family you need to visit (still need to call them though, haha), and you can basically stick to your community and organize a few games of pickup if that’s an option. Being overseas, let’s say in a place like Egypt, or Algeria, in which there is a real spirit of Ramadan and Eid, and in which an entire neighborhood might be celebrating the same thing you are (which means the holiday pastries, the street fireworks, the colorful clothing, all that comes out) – that adds flavor to Eid that is almost always missing in smaller communities in the USA.

What would you like Non- Muslims around the world to know about EID?

I guess if there were one thing I would want for you to know about Eid, is that Muslims are generally low-key, and Eid exemplifies that. We don’t necessarily have strange rituals as Muslims – we have very little symbolism in Islam if any, and we spend our time on practical things, reflecting on our character and spirituality. 

 

 

 

 

Eid around the world- Sakinah

 
 

Sakinah

Sakinah is a public middle (primary) school teacher in Malaysia. She teaches Malay language and loves to travel during school holidays. Sakinah hopes to get involved in volunteering and inspiring unfortunatee kids to believe in themselves 

Connect with  Sakinah on her Instagram 

What country do you currently live in?

I live in Malaysia, to be specific in Sabah, Borneo Island.

On a scale of 1 – 10 how excited are you for EID this year?

I wasn’t very excited actually, because for me, it’s just the same as any other Eid. However, I do look forward to the coming Eid. So how excited am I?  Maybe just about 6 , hehehe .

How do you celebrate EID?

Well, basically our tradition is that my father will pray for Eid in the mosque while the rest my family waits for him. After that we kiss our parents hands. Because, I work this year,  I  give Eid money to my parents and sisters (who are still studying).  Then, we visit our family in their houses.  After visiting 4 houses, we go back to our other grandparents house which is not that far, just about 30 minutes drive. We just spend a night there.

This year, we decided to make an Open House during the third Eid day. In Malaysia, we have this tradition called Open House, where  people will come from usually 10, or 11 in the morning till the evening. We serve our traditional food which we only make during Eid, like Ketupat, the glutinous rice in coconut leaves, or Kelupis, the glutinous rice too in banana leaves, We eat this with peanut sauce, the other menu is of course beef. We also make Rendang, a Malaysian food with a lot of spices and coconut milk. Peanut sauce is pretty much a must during Eid.

Eid Around The World- Food

Buginese traditional fermented glutinous rice

Do you get days off from work/school for EID?

Yes. So In Malaysia as a public servant especially teachers like me, I have 10 days off while other workers have 3 days or 5 days off.

What makes EID special to you?

The thing I love the most about EID is being with all your family members. Visiting one family house to another, at least we get to do that once a year since everyone is busy in their daily lives.

In your own opinion where’s the best place to celebrate EID?

For me, the best place to celebrate EID is of course with a family.

What would you like Non- Muslims around the world to know about EID?

I would like you to know that you’re invited to come and celebrate with us, especially in my country. Even if you’re strangers, just come and enjoy the food.  In addition, I’d like you to understand that Eid is a symbol of Victory for Muslims since we’ve just finished Ramadan.

 

 

 

Eid- Muslim Travelers

 

Zain and Huda

Zain and Huda, are an American Muslim couple who launched MuslimTravelers in 2012 to help counter the negative portrayal of Muslims in the media. While juggling their full-time jobs as engineers, the 28-year-olds have jet set to over 50 countries across the globe, documenting their experiences along the way. Their goal is to shatter stereotypes about Muslims, build bridges of understanding, and create more empathy in the world through what they love most – travel!

As successful social media influencers, Zain and Huda work with brands and tourism boards across the world, have spoken at various travel conferences, and have been featured in a variety of both Muslim and non-Muslim media outlets. They are dedicated to providing authentic content that will open hearts and bring about a more peaceful world through travel.

You can check their Website or  Connect with them on Facebook,  Instagram and Twitter 

 

 

What country do you currently live in?

USA.

On a scale of 1 – 10 how excited are you for EID this year?

10.

How do you celebrate EID?

We first go to the large Eid prayer in central Houston where over 15,000 Muslims come together. Afterwards, we go visit our family and friends.

Do you get days off from work/school for EID?

No. We have to use vacation or take time off from school if Eid falls on a weekday.

What makes EID special to you?

The feeling of accomplishment after completing a 30-day training program designed to make us better Muslims.

In your own opinion where’s the best place to celebrate EID?

It doesn’t matter where, as long as you are with your family and friends.

What would you like Non- Muslims around the world to know about EID?

It’s a celebration that you have to work for, which makes you appreciate it so much more.

 

That’s all folks! I hope you enjoyed learning about EID around the world. Check out a similar series on Ramadan. Still have doubts about Eid or Ramadan? Comment down below and I’ll do my best to answer your questions 🙂

 

I hope you felt inspired! 

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Eid around the world

 

 
 
 

2017-08-27T17:10:44+00:00 July 6th, 2017|Lifestyle|0 Comments

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